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Cornerstone Montessori Children's House

31700 NW Commercial St. #580
North Plains, OR 97133

Phone:
(503) 647-7402

Website:

Since 1997, Cornerstone Montessori Children's House has provided families in and around the Hillsboro School District an individualized preschool program that meets the unique developmental needs of every child we serve. Families across Washington County - including North Plains, Hillsboro, Forest Grove, Cornelius, and Banks - enjoy a comfortable, family-like atmosphere where their 2 1/2 - 6 year old children use engaging, multi-sensory materials to teach themselves in a uniquely Montessori hands-on manner. The low student-teacher ratio at our school also helps ensure that each child receives the individual attention they deserve. We offer an activity filled day that encourages the students' intellectual, social, physical, creative and moral development in a caring, nurturing environment. While they are having fun learning about math, geography, science, language, art, and music, the children are discovering something much more important - a love for learning itself. Each exciting discovery they make helps develop their independence, inner-discipline, and self-esteem.

Philosophy & Approach

School Philosophy

General Approach to Learning: Montessori

From the Director:

The Montessori approach is child-centered, but adult guided. It is structured, but free for learning and emphasizes basics in an enjoyable way. The teacher "follows the child" and their needs, presents a lesson, and then steps back so the child can explore on their own. Through observation, Dr. Montessori discovered that children between the ages of 3 to 6 have an especially keen sensitivity to many areas of learning and development. These “sensitive periods”, as she called them, start to fade just as many educational programs are preparing to start their work with the child.

Quality of Teaching

Individualized Teaching: From the Director

The Montessori method is an individualized program that will meet the unique developmental needs of the child. The teacher works with each child individually and can therefore "follow the child" by giving them the appropriate lesson they need. In this way, children can work beside their peers without feeling overwhemed or bored. Their self-esteem, independence, inner-discipline, and love for learning grows by leaps and bounds.

Day in the Life

General School Mission

The families we serve enjoy a comfortable, family-like atmosphere where the children are able to interact in a uniquely Montessori way. The low student-teacher ratio at our school also helps ensure that each child receives the individual attention they deserve. We offer an activity filled day that encourages the students' intellectual, social, physical, creative and moral development in a caring, nurturing environment. Our program will help your child develop self-esteem, independence, and inner-discipline. Most importantly, our Montessori program fosters a love for learning that will stay with your child for a lifetime.

A Typical Day

We provide special materials that help the children teach themselves in a very concrete, hands-on manner. The Montessori teacher uses these materials to present engaging lessons at the appropriate time to satisfy the unique developmental needs of each child. The children are free to choose this work throughout the morning.
About 11:00, we have a group time full of singing, stories, and sharing. We go outside at 11:30. The children who stay for lunch come in at noon.

Home-School Connection

Home-School Connection: From the Director

Parents are encouraged to ask questions and share information via email, phone, or when they pick up and drop off their children as time allows. A parent-teacher conference is scheduled in the fall, and other meetings can be scheduled by request.

Separation

Separation is Handled through:

  • Pre-entry meetings with parents at school

Handling Separation: From the Director

It is very common for young children to display separation anxiety at the beginning of the school year, especially if they aren't used to being away from their parents. Each child is different, so this might last a day, a week, or even longer. If the parent displays confidence and encouragement when they drop off their child, this anxiety is usually short-lived. Children know if their parents are apprehensive about leaving them. Quick, cheerful good-byes are best. Allowing a teacher to bring them in from the car also helps. With a little comfort from the teacher and help connecting to an activity, most fussing and crying stops within minutes after the parent leaves.