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Pine Village Preschool

617 Cambridge Street, Brightn, MA, 02135
Brighton, MA 02135

Phone:
(617) 562-0880

Website:

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Philosophy & Approach

School Philosophy

General Approach to Learning: Play-Based

Curriculum & Teaching Approach

Learning Philosophy & Tools

  Play- based mostly teacher led not formally in curriculum conducive environment
Language       more

More Information

  • Tracing paper and other writing instruments
  • A well-stocked bookcase
  • Spanish Language Immersion
Oral language  
Nursery rhymes, poems, songs  
Storybook reading  
Emerging literacy skills  
Cognitive development
Math & number sense more

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  • Puzzles
  • Manipulative, Blocks, Cooking, Measuring
Time & space more

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  • Calendars and clocks
  • Parquetry blocks, pegboards, and mosaic toys
  • Maps
  • Building blocks
Sci. reasoning/physical world more

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  • A place for science activities such as growing plants
  • Pets for children to watch and care for
  • Experiments, Lots of Nature activities
Music more

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  • Musical instruments
  • Music classes, music & movement classes.
Visual arts more

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  • Materials such as paint, ink, paintbrushes, crayons, markers, chalk, paper, etc.
  • Art work on the walls
  • Drama
Physical activity more

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  • A playground with climbing equipment
  • Bean bags, balls, and other objects that children can throw, kick, and play
  • Tricycles
  • Enough room for children to move around and play and a suitable indoor alternative to the outdoor playground on rainy days
  • Sandboxes and/or water stations for play
Other subjects taught Our Spanish Language Immersion Program Immersion is defined as a method of foreign language instruction in which the regular school curriculum is taught through the medium of the language. Spanish is the vehicle for content instruction at Pine Village, it is not the subject of instruction. We present our language program in the same way we present instruction in all curriculum areas. Children incorporate new information into their lives as they are able to process it and comprehend it. The children's ability to accept, and understand Spanish comes as they progress through our program month after month. The daily schedule in each classroom is broken down into different activity times. We have designed our immersion program to be incorporated into all classroom activities on an 80:20 immersion model. As the children become familiar with high frequency phrases which they hear repeatedly, they will gain natural comprehension of the second language without translation. Initially the children are exposed to spontaneous language, words and phrases that are repetitious throughout the day. Songs, books, manipulatives and words in print, all incorporate the bilingual immersion approach. As the children become progressively more familiar and comfortable hearing, understanding and ultimately responding in Spanish, it becomes a natural part of their thought process. The long-range goals of our immersion program include: 1) developing proficiency in Spanish as a first or second language; 2) developing positive attitudes toward those who speak a foreign language and toward their culture(s); 3) developing English language skills commensurate with expectations for student's age and abilities; 4) gaining skills and knowledge in the content areas of the curriculum in keeping with stated objectives in these areas. Knowing two or more languages truly gives children many advantages in life. Bilingual children have the advantage of knowing two cultures, of being able to communicate with a wider variety of people, and of possible economic advantages in their future.

From the Director:

Pine Village Preschool Inc. Educational Objectives How Young Children Learn Play is the key to happy, socially adept, intelligent children. Children are active learners, making sense of the world in their own unique ways. When they choose their own play, they are in charge, setting up their own problems and controlling their own learning. This is a powerful and exciting position for children, who are, in real life, often subject to the demands of others. Self-guided play enhances children's enthusiasm, curiosity and creativity. Pretend play in particular forms the groundwork for later intellectual and social developments. In pretend, children can be who they wish and go where they please. They learn to cope with feelings, cooperate and share. They learn new words, how to take turns, and how to solve problems creatively. When problem solving is made real in play, children build flexible and supple intellectual skills. They learn that there are many ways to deal with the world around them. In sum, it is through free and guided play that children learn without being 'taught,' and it is this type of learning that has the most meaningful and lasting effects. The Role of Teachers As teachers, we see our role as facilitators; teaching is incidental and part of the children's play. Their learning is embedded in a supportive context. We join our students in activities of their choosing, and respect each child's right to move through the curriculum at his or her own pace. We provide an emotionally supportive environment, set up to respect a range of developmental levels. Curriculum The curriculum for young children encompasses the schedule of activities, the physical learning environment, and the specific curriculum areas. We recognize that while we can separate and identify these specific curriculum areas, they tend to interact naturally in a child's experiences to contribute to his or her social, emotional and intellectual growth. The Schedule Routine provides stability in children's lives. Breaks in routine provide stimulation and increased chances for learning. Our day's schedule has a predictable structure, allowing children to gain confidence and develop a comfort level with the school environment. Within that structure we provide flexibility, giving children freedom to make choices and to interact with each other. We occasionally alter routine for special occasions such as class trips or holiday projects. The day is balanced with indoor and outdoor time and individual and group activities. The Environment and Curriculum Areas Our Spanish Language Immersion Program Immersion is defined as a method of foreign language instruction in which the regular school curriculum is taught through the medium of the language. Spanish is the vehicle for content instruction at Pine Village; it is not the subject of instruction. We present our language program in the same way we present instruction in all curriculum areas. Children incorporate new information into their lives as they are able to process it and comprehend it. The child's' ability to accept, and understand Spanish comes as they progress through our program month after month. Initially the children are exposed to spontaneous language, words and phrases that are repeated throughout the day. Songs, books, manipulatives and words in print, all incorporate the bilingual immersion approach. As the children become progressively more familiar and comfortable hearing, understanding and responding in Spanish it becomes a natural part of their thought process. The long-range goals of our immersion program include: 1) developing proficiency in Spanish as a first or second language; 2) developing positive attitudes toward those who speak a foreign language and toward their culture(s); 3) developing English language skills commensurate with expectations for student's age and abilities; 4) gaining skills and knowledge in the content areas of the curriculum in keeping with stated objectives in these areas. Knowing two or more languages gives children many advantages in life. Bilingual children have the advantage of knowing two cultures, of being able to communicate with a wider variety of people, and of possible economic advantages in their future. Language Arts Language skills such as listening, speaking, reading and writing are all interconnected. Our goals for children are to speak naturally and easily, to listen with respect and enthusiasm, and to develop a desire to write and read for themselves. We immerse them in these language 'arts' through their daily experiences with dramatic play, songs, story sharing, and individual reading. Sociodramatic play feeds into early literacy, as it provides practice for storytelling, and listening to and retaining information. Print, in its various forms, is an integral part of the classroom experience, with a wide range of books available to children at all times, and during daily story sharing. We provide a comfortable reading area where children can read or be read to, and we include books in other areas of the room, to integrate print and reading naturally into the children's day. We encourage a love of reading and storytelling, and a respect for books. Children's language skills are also enhanced through a variety of symbolic 'languages' including drawing/painting, sculpture, and writing. Painting, drawing, building, and using plastic materials such as clay, sand, and water are all included in our curriculum. With these materials children practice the symbolic and motor skills which are precursors to writing; they gain opportunities for self expression and experimentation; and they gain motivation for language development and early writing as they add titles, descriptions or stories to their artworks. Mathematics Young children learn math concepts best from simple, hands-on work with concrete objects. Teachers emphasize these concepts as they come up during activities such as block play, work with puzzles, cubes and measuring tools. Mathematical concepts also arise naturally during activities such as snack time, taking attendance, adding days of the month to the calendar, and cooking. When children build with blocks or make roads for cars, for example, they are learning about spatial relationships and equivalences. When they sort, divide, and combine blocks or other objects, they are learning to count, add up, and take away. When they divide a piece of fruit among friends they are learning the relationship of parts to whole. When they set the table for snack time they are visualizing patterns (the basis for understanding numerical operations.) They even develop mathematical concepts while cleaning up toys, as they classify and categorize objects by color, shape or function. As children begin to incorporate these concepts, they will discuss the symbols that correspond with their mathematical understandings. Symbolic representations would include counting, number, operations on numbers, place value, parts of whole, weighing and measuring. Science Young children are natural scientists. They are curious and love to experiment with the physical properties of their surroundings. Our students gain a scientific understanding of their world in many ways. They engage in discussions about the needs and functions of their own bodies (food, water, sleep.) They learn about quantity and matter by manipulating objects such as clay, paint, water, and wood. They may roll, flatten and break clay, note differences when pouring water through rocks or through sand, or observe how weight affects the speed of a car rolling down a chute. In cooking, they learn how applying heat or cold to combinations of ingredients results in remarkable changes. They learn about the earth by interacting with the trees, plants, and

Quality of Teaching

Individualized Teaching: From the Director

Our approach to teaching is based on the premise that each child learns at his/her own pace. Curriculum and activities are organized around the individual needs of each child thus ensuring that all children are challenged at a level that is appropriate to their age and stage of development.

Day in the Life

General School Mission

Our Philosophy Each day of a child's life should be an opportunity for new experiences and discoveries. Through play, exploration and language the children will gain a true understanding of their environment and the world around them. These experiences will prepare them to be successful in life, confident learners and true friends. We know that play is children's' work. Therefore we provide a safe, warm and loving environment that is enriched with opportunities for discovery and learning. Our classrooms are designed to meet the individual needs of each child through self-directed play and teacher led activities. The teaching staff has designed a curriculum that includes hands-on activities, which encourage the child's individual abilities rather than a final result. Our program incorporates Spanish into the curriculum in a natural way, just as we immerse math skills and literacy into the day's activities. Each day is also filled with music, art and physical activities, all of which encourage exploration, problem-solving skills and self-esteem. Nature itself is a fascinating learning tool, and we are blessed to be surrounded by natures' beauty. Our 'outdoor classroom' will be utilized for sensory activities, science, gross motor play and quiet space for reading and drawing. Pine Village Preschool has adopted a 'village approach' to raising children. We believe that strong relationships between community, parents, children and teachers are essential to a positive learning experience for all children. We encourage parent participation in our school and our learning experiences.

A Typical Day

Sample Daily Schedule 8:00 - 9:00: Free Choice: Centers Open 9:15 - 9:30: Clean Up, Wash Hands 9:00 - 9:30: Snack Time 9:30 - 10:00: Circle Time: Stories, Finger Plays & Group Activities 10:00 - 10:30: Art Activity: Theme Based Projects 10:30 - 11:00: Free Choice: Centers Open 11:00 - 12:15: Group Activities: Gross Motor, Outside Time 12:15 - 12:30: Wash Hands & Prepare for Lunch 12:30 - 1:00: Lunch 1:00 - 1:30: Story/Quiet Time, Bathroom and Clean Up 1:30 - 3:00: Rest Time 3:00 - 3:30: Choice Time, Bathroom, Clean Up 3:30 - 4:00: Snack 4:00 - 5:30: Group Activities/Outside Time

Home-School Connection

Home-School Connection: From the Director

Parent Communication is essential for the well being of each child and family enrolled at the school. It is essential that parents and teachers communicate on a daily basis as well as having regularly scheduled parent conferences. Parents are permitted and encouraged to visit Pine Village Preschool and their child's class whenever their child is present. Curriculum content will be posted in written form each day in your child's classroom. This will contain a list of the day's events and activities your child has participated in. Please encourage your child's progress by checking the curriculum each day, and talking to your child about what he or she has done at the end of each day. Parent conferences will take place at the school twice a year. The dates and times of these will be posted well in advance of the conference date. A portfolio and written progress report will be reviewed as we discuss developmental goals and objectives for each child. Special arrangements may also be made at the request of either teachers or parents to meet 1:1 and conference about a child or event. Memos and notices may also be distributed to parents on a daily or weekly basis. Please check your child's 'mail box' at the end of each day to collect these and any artwork being sent home. Pine Village Preschool publishes a quarterly newsletter and parents are welcome to contribute to this publication if they so wish. We ask parents to check out our website at www.pinevillagepreschool.com for more information on our program or to browse the many informative articles on child growth and development. We have a very active and involved parent committee group, which is a wonderful way to get more involved in our school and also a great source of information/communication. We present a workshop each year in October on 'Kindergarten Choice'. This is open to all families but strongly encouraged for Pre-K families. We have a panel of past parents who come to present information on the research they conducted as they looked at elementary schools for their children. There is also an opportunity for current families to ask questions and share any additional information/experiences they may have.

Parents Say They are Encouraged to:

  • Hold social events at the school to build community
  • Fundraise
  • Are able to visit the school anytime we want
  • Go on field trips
  • Volunteer in the classroom
  • Receive newsletters

Modes of Communication

  • Notes
  • Phone Calls
  • Voice Mail
  • Email
  • Special Meetings
  • Two or More Regular Conferences
  • Drop-Off
  • Pick-Up
  • Regular newsletter/printed updates circulated to the whole school

Separation

Separation is Handled through:

  • Pre-entry meetings with parents at school
  • Small group sessions
  • Parents in classroom early on
  • Abbreviated schedule at start of school year

Handling Separation: From the Director

We have welcome morning on the first week of school. This is a time for parents and children to come visit the school and start to become familiar with their classroom, the teacher and each other. Parents are encouraged to do shorter days, if possible, during the first week of school. Curriculum during this period focuses on activities that help us to get to know each other and become more comfortable with our routines. Parents are invited to spend a little time in the morning with their child and when leaving to leave with a smile and a positive comment. We let parents know that they are welcome to contact us as often as they need during this period to check up on their child's transition. Our teachers are very aware that this is a stressful time for many children and almost all parents, we offer lots of hugs, kisses and encouragement. Our goal is to help children through this transition by using all the strategies we know from experience to be effective.