SavvyPicks: My Friends Make Me Happy

Eliza Clark
June 18, 2008

Is there anything better or more fascinating than watching our little ones make friends?

These relationships are quite something. Some children's friendships are as fleeting as a morning at the park. Others may persist for years to come, through schools and family connections. They can be tempestuous, yet even the most violent storms ("I'll never be your friend again!") can pass in an instant. Overwhelmingly, though, these young friendships are joyous and imaginative and inspiring.

So here's to the littlest pals, who make each other so very happy. And to our favorite books that celebrate young friendships.

  • Play With Me by Marie Hall Ets. Making friends is this simple: ask, "Will you play with me?" often enough, and lovely friends will follow.
  • Being Friends by Karen Beaumont. In which two girls adore each other for their similarities and their differences.
  • How to Be A Friend by Laura Krasny Brown. A primer for those new to the friendship business, and a delight for us all.
  • May I Bring a Friend? by Beatrice de Regniers. A charming, whimsical romp that models the unfailing courtesy we owe to our friends.
  • Amos and Boris by William Steig. This book about the most improbable of friendships holds a special place. Don't let your child miss it.
  • Chester's Way by Kevin Henkes. Because friends sometimes have different ways of doing things, and that's not just okay -- it can be positively great.
  • George and Martha by James Marshall. These two buddies are too funny. We love them immoderately.
  • Frog and Toad Are Friends by Arnold Lobel. Classic, never trite tales that will take your child from storytime to early reading, and never fail to entrance.
  • Making Friends by Fred Rogers. Dear old Mr. Rogers -- he knows what he's talking about, that's for sure.
  • The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry and the Hungry Bear by Don and Audrey Wood. How good of a friend are you? Would you share your red, ripe, succulent strawberry?
  • Friends by Helme Heine. A reminder that children (and farm animals) who love nothing more than playing with their friends all day long still want to be tucked into their very own beds at nighttime.

Is there anything better or more fascinating than watching our little ones make friends?

These relationships are quite something. Some children's friendships are as fleeting as a morning at the park. Others may persist for years to come, through schools and family connections. They can be tempestuous, yet even the most violent storms ("I'll never be your friend again!") can pass in an instant. Overwhelmingly, though, these young friendships are joyous and imaginative and inspiring.

So here's to the littlest pals, who make each other so very happy. And to our favorite books that celebrate young friendships.

  • Play With Me by Marie Hall Ets. Making friends is this simple: ask, "Will you play with me?" often enough, and lovely friends will follow.
  • Being Friends by Karen Beaumont. In which two girls adore each other for their similarities and their differences.
  • How to Be A Friend by Laura Krasny Brown. A primer for those new to the friendship business, and a delight for us all.
  • May I Bring a Friend? by Beatrice de Regniers. A charming, whimsical romp that models the unfailing courtesy we owe to our friends.
  • Amos and Boris by William Steig. This book about the most improbable of friendships holds a special place. Don't let your child miss it.
  • Chester's Way by Kevin Henkes. Because friends sometimes have different ways of doing things, and that's not just okay -- it can be positively great.
  • George and Martha by James Marshall. These two buddies are too funny. We love them immoderately.
  • Frog and Toad Are Friends by Arnold Lobel. Classic, never trite tales that will take your child from storytime to early reading, and never fail to entrance.
  • Making Friends by Fred Rogers. Dear old Mr. Rogers -- he knows what he's talking about, that's for sure.
  • The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry and the Hungry Bear by Don and Audrey Wood. How good of a friend are you? Would you share your red, ripe, succulent strawberry?
  • Friends by Helme Heine. A reminder that children (and farm animals) who love nothing more than playing with their friends all day long still want to be tucked into their very own beds at nighttime.

From the Parents

  • Parent # 1

    Don't forget Angelina Ballerina! Angelina and Alice are BFF.

    over a year ago

  • Parent # 2

    I'd also recommend "Together" by Jane Simmons.

    over a year ago

  •  

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